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How sustainable is Toshiba ?

Toshiba & sustainability


Toshiba

First milestones, should be better Click here for score rapport: 8 out of 39

Sustainability summary

Based on our sustainability criteria, Toshiba has achieved the D-label. The brand has started to take sustainability into account. Toshiba is transparent about its carbon emissions and already lowered them in the last couple of years. The brand is also transparent on its material and water use and recycles about 8% of its sold products, which seems low, however it is a best practice compared to competitors. In any way, a lot more can be done to prove that Toshiba's products and operations are fair and green.

Brand owner: Toshiba Group
Head office: Tokyo, Japan
Sector: Electronics
Categories : Smartphone, Laptop, notebook, Tablet
Free Tags: Computer, HiFi & Audio, TV & Home cinema, Camera, Accessories & Services

What's your sustainability news about Toshiba?

Toshiba sustainability score report

Last edited: 1 December 2014 by Mario
Last reviewed: 1 December 2014 by Mario

Questions about Climate Change/ Carbon Emissions

2 out of 6
1. Is there a policy for the brand (company) to minimize, reduce or compensate carbon emissions? Toshiba implements several policy measures to reduce carbon emissions, such as taking energy conservation measures at all business and production sites. Source
2. Has the brand (company) disclosed the annual absolute carbon footprint of its 'own operations' (Scope 1 & 2) and has the brand already reduced or compensated 10% of these emissions in the last 5 years? Toshiba increased its gross climate footprint of own operations from 2.59 million tons of CO2e in FY09 to 2.76 million tons of CO2e in FY14. This represents an increase of around 6,5%. Source
3. Has the brand (company) set a target to reduce its absolute ‘own operations’ carbon emissions by at least 20% within the next 5 years? Toshiba expects greenhouse gas emissions to be 4,39 million tons of CO2e in 2015, compared to base year 1990. Compared to current emissions however, this constitutes a rise of around 59%. Source
4. Does the brand (company) publish the annual carbon footprint that also covers the major suppliers, and does the brand have an effective policy in place to reduce these carbon emissions? Toshiba reports the CO2e emissions of its supply chain. Thereby purchased goods and services account 7 million tons of CO2e for FY13. Toshiba states to calculate and analyze CO2e emissions throughout its entire supply chain and to work effectively to reduce CO2e emissions throughout the product life cycle by quantitatively analyzing emissions per category. Source
5. Is at least 35% of the electricity used by the brand (company) generated from renewable resources, such as wind or solar energy? In FY13, Toshiba used 10,991 MWh's worth of renewable energy, which had an effect of reducing CO2e emissions by about 5.353 tons. This is not sufficient. Source
6. Do all new products of the brand meet energy efficiency requirements such as Energy Star (where applicable)? Almost all new consumer electronic products meet the Energy Star requirements, but not all. Source

Questions about Environmental Policy

3 out of 19
1. Has the brand (company) eliminated PVC in all new products? Toshiba states it is working on reducing both PVC and BFR from products (see link, p.34 & 59). Source
2. Has the brand (company) eliminated BFR's in all new products? See remark environmental policy question 1. Source
3. Has the brand (company) eliminated at least 2 of the 3 groups of suspect chemicals (beryllium, antimony and phthalates) in all its new products already? Toshiba is not very clear about the current status of eliminating beryllium, antimony and phthalates in its products. Source
4. Has the brand (company) banned the use of benzene and n-hexane in the final assembly of products? Toshiba has prohibited benzene but is not clear about the ban of n-hexane. Source
5. Has the brand (company) banned the use of benzene and n-hexane in the full production chains? See remark environmental policy question 4. Source
6. Does the brand (company) publish its annual material footprint, or alternatively material footprints for each sold product, that includes packaging materials, and does the brand have an effective policy in place to reduce the overall environmental impact of material use? "Toshiba publishes a rough but complete material flow for FY13 and states that effective initiatives based on environmental impact assessments are carried out across the entire product life cycle (see link, p.36-37)." Source
7. Does the brand (company) only use universal plugs for chargers (where applicable) or does the brand offer the charger as optional to the product? Toshiba does not mention anything about universal chargers or about offering the charger as optional to the product. Source
8. Does the brand (company) source at least 10% of its plastics from recycled plastic streams and does the give a timeline to increase this percentage to at least 25% by 2025 ? In FY13, Toshiba used 6.2% plastic from recycled streams. The only target that is mentioned, is one for 2.8 % recycled plastic use, which thus is already met (see link, p.55). Source
9. Does the brand (company) source at least 20% of its plastics from recycled plastic streams? See remark environmental policy question 8. Source
10. Does the brand (company) have an effective policy in place to reduce the environmental impact of its consumer packaging and does the brand already show best practices, such as using at least 80% environmentally certified or recycled paper products? Toshiba has a policy to minimize packaging to reduce its environmental impact. However, for FY13 it is only reported, that approximately 68,000 tons of packaging materials were used (see link, p.55). Source
11. Has the brand (company) a take back program and is the take back recyling rate higher than 5% of the weight of the annually products sold? Toshiba has collected 123 kton of end-of-life products in FY13 and publishes data on its recycling efforts (100 kton), which constitutes around 8.6% of total material use (1181 ktons, as found on p.36 of the 2014 CSR report), see link to next question. Source
12. Is the take back recyling rate higher than 10% of the weight of the annually products sold? See remark environmental policy question 11. Source
13. Has the brand (company) an active policy in place to increase the product life-span of products, such as longer warranty periods or easy repair with easy ordering of spare parts? In Toshiba's life-cycle approach, only energy efficiency and the reduction of volume and mass of its products are mentioned for the usage stage. Source
14. Does the brand (company) use replaceable batteries in all portable devices? Toshiba does not mention any use of replaceable batteries for its products. Source
15. Does the brand (company) provide online repair manuals for all products? Toshiba does not mention anything about repair manuals on its website. Source
16. Does the brand (company) guarantee supply of spare parts and software updates for all products, for at least 3 years after end of production? Toshiba does not mention anything about the availability of spare parts and software updates after end of production on its website. Source
17. Does the brand (company) give at least a 3 years warranty on all products? Toshiba does not mention anything about an extended warranty on its products on its website. Source
18. Does the brand (company) publish a water and/or land use footprint and is there a policy to minimize, reduce or compensate this footprint? Toshiba reports the total withdrawal, discharge, consumption and recycled water volumes across your operations for FY14, which accounts 93.166 megaliters. Toshiba reports to implement policy measures to reduce water us (see link, download "Water 2014"). Source
19. Does the brand (company) publish a water and/or land use footprint that also covers its most important suppliers? Toshibas key suppliers aren´t required to report its water use (see link, download "Water 2014"). Source

Questions about Labour Conditions/ Fair Trade

3 out of 14
1. Does the brand (company) regularly publish an updated list of smelters that are identified in the own supply chain? Toshiba does not publish a list of smelters on its website. Source
2. Does the brand (company) have a clear policy to only source from smelters that have passed the conflict-free audits, and has the brand already achieved this for at least one metal/mineral? Toshiba publishes information about on respective policy measures, but doesn´t state that at least one mineral is sourced conflict free by now. Source
3. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 1 initiative that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Toshiba participates in the in the Public-Private Alliance (PPA) for Responsible Minerals Trade. Source
4. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 2 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Toshiba is also a member of the Conflict-Free Smelter Program. Source
5. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 3 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Toshiba also mentions participation in JEITA's Responsible Minerals Trade Working Group as part of its efforts to perform due diligence, but the performance of participants nor the initiative itself is clear. Source
6. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 4 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Toshiba does not mention any more initiatives on its website. Source
7. Does the brand (company) have a Code of Conduct (CoC) for both its own factories and those of its suppliers, which includes the following standards: No forced or slave labor, no child labor, no discrimination of any kind and a safe and hygienic workplace? In the Toshiba Group “Supply-Chain CSR Deployment Guidebook”, all standards are mentioned. Source
8. Does the brand’s (company’s) CoC include at least 3 of the following workers rights: 1. a formally registered employment relationship 2. a maximum working week of 48 hours with voluntary paid overtime of 12 hours maximum 3. a sufficient living wage 4. form and join labor unions and bargain collectively; and in those situations where these rights are restricted under law, to develop parallel means? 1. Not mentioned; 2. Maximum working is based on the legal limit only; 3. No, Wages are based on the legal limit only; 4. The right to form and join labor unions is mentioned, but no parallel means where these rights are restricted under law is mentioned. Source
9. Does the brand (company) have a published list of direct suppliers that have collectively contributed to more than 90% of the purchase volume? Toshiba does not provide a significant list of direct suppliers on its website. Source
10. Is the brand (company) a member of a multi stakeholder initiative (MSI), wherein independent NGO’s or labor unions are represented, that collectively aims to improve labor conditions and that carries out independent audits? Or does the brand (company) significantly purchase its supplies from factories certified by such MSI’s? Toshiba is a member of EICC, but civil society organizations do not have a decisive voice in this initiative. Source
11. Does the brand (company) annually report on the results of its labor conditions policy? Is more than 95% of supplier monitored for labour conditions? Toshiba mentions performing audits and publishes some information on these audits on its website. However, this information is not sufficient to determine the percentage of suppliers monitored or compliance to the CoC. Source
12. Is at least 25% of suppliers in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct? See remark for labor conditions question 11. Source
13. Is at least 50% of suppliers in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct? See remark for labor conditions question 11. Source
14. Is at least 50% of suppliers in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct - including a living wage? See remark for labor conditions question 11. Source