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How sustainable is Lenovo ?

Lenovo & sustainability


Lenovo
First milestones, should be better Click here for score rapport: 10 out of 39

Sustainability summary

Lenovo has achieved the D-label. Lenovo has started to take sustainability into account. Lenovo for instance scores good points on partnering with initiatives to avoid the use of conflict minerals. Still, a lot more can be done by Lenovo to prove that its products and operations are fair and green.

Brand owner: Lenovo Group Limited
Head office: Beijing, China
Sector: Electronics
Categories : Laptop, notebook, Tablet, PC
Free Tags: Computer, Accessories & Services

What's your sustainability news about Lenovo?

Lenovo sustainability score report

Last edited: 17 May 2016 by Angela
Last reviewed: 17 May 2016 by Mario

Questions about Climate Change/ Carbon Emissions

3 out of 6
1. Is there a policy for the brand (company) to minimize, reduce or compensate carbon emissions? Lenovo implements several measures to reduce climate emissions, such as improving the energy efficiency of operations or the purchase of renewable energy (see link, page 74-84). Source
2. Has the brand (company) disclosed the annual absolute carbon footprint of its 'own operations' (Scope 1 & 2) and has the brand already reduced or compensated 10% of these emissions in the last 5 years? Lenovo increased its climate footprint (Scope 1&2) of own operations from 131,246 tons of CO2e in FY 13/14 to 164,486 tons of CO2e in FY 14/15. This represents an increase of around 25% (see link, page 19). Source
3. Has the brand (company) set a target to reduce its absolute ‘own operations’ carbon emissions by at least 20% within the next 5 years? Lenovo (brand owner of Motorola Mobility) has set a target to reduce 40% of its global own operations greenhouse gas emissions by 2020, compared to base year 2010 (see link, page 26). Source
4. Does the brand (company) publish the annual carbon footprint that also covers the major suppliers, and does the brand have an effective policy in place to reduce these carbon emissions? Lenovo reports the greenhouse gas emissions for its key first tier suppliers (around 90% of its direct spent purchase volume), and describes its policies to reduce climate emissions in the supply chain. They account 1.054,683 tons of CO2e for FY 14/15 (was at 1.270,866 tons of CO2e in FY 12/23) (see link, page 19, 80-84). Source
5. Is at least 35% of the electricity used by the brand (company) generated from renewable resources, such as wind or solar energy? In FY 14/15 Lenovo´s total level of renewable energy use was around 7% (15,201 MWh). However, only around 0,1% were generated by Lenovo (solar panel arrays in Shanghai). The remaining 6,0% are RECs (Renewable Energy Credits) (see link, page 19). Source
6. Do all new products of the brand meet energy efficiency requirements such as Energy Star (where applicable)? Lenovo communicates that many notebook, desktop, server and monitor products satisfy and even exceed the current ENERGY STAR requirements. Also a clear overview per product type is provided. But, not all product meet energy efficiency requirements such as Energy Star (see link, page 21 & 91). Source

Questions about Environmental Policy

2 out of 19
1. Has the brand (company) eliminated PVC in all new products? Lenovo has already phased out PVC and BFR's from all mechanical plastic parts of their products, but not from all of items, such as power cords and cables. A time line for the remaining products is not mentioned (See link, page 89-90). Source
2. Has the brand (company) eliminated BFR's in all new products? See remark for environmental policy question 1. Source
3. Has the brand (company) eliminated at least 2 of the 3 groups of suspect chemicals (beryllium, antimony and phthalates) in all its new products already? Lenovo states that beryllium and antimony will be eliminated by 2012 'where technically feasible', which is not defined. Also no intermediate status is reported. The same applies for Phthalates. Source
4. Has the brand (company) banned the use of benzene and n-hexane in the final assembly of products? Lenovo doesn't mention whether benzene and n-hexane is banned in the final assembly of products. Source
5. Has the brand (company) banned the use of benzene and n-hexane in the full production chains? See remark for environmental policy question 4. Source
6. Does the brand (company) publish its annual material footprint, or alternatively material footprints for each sold product, and does the brand have an effective policy in place to reduce the overall environmental impact of material use? Lenovo publishes a Product Carbon Footprint of three typical products, not at individual level, using the Product Attribute to Impact Algorithm (PAIA). Also, use of raw materials isn't covered (see link, page 4). Source
7. Does the brand offer the charger as optional to the product? Lenovo doesn't mention anything about offering chargers as optional to its products. Source
8. Does the brand (company) source at least 10% of its plastics from recycled plastic streams and does the give a timeline to increase this percentage to at least 25% by 2025 ? Lenovo reports on the use of recycled plastics in its products, and shows progress in term of total use. However, an overall percentage of at least 10% isn't specified yet (see link, page 20, 87-89). Source
9. Does the brand (company) source at least 20% of its plastics from recycled plastic streams? See remark for environmental policy question 8. Source
10. Does the brand have clear objectives to minimize the environmental impact of packaging, by reducing, re-using and recycling, and does the brand annually report on these results? Lenovo implements several measures concerning product packaging, such as maintaining a 100% use FSC or equivalent certification (not specified any further) for all virgin fiber used for packaging for all product brands. But, Lenovo doesn't report the overall footprint of its packaging materials used (see link, page 24-27, 92-94). Source
11. Has the brand (company) a take back program and is the take back recyling rate higher than 5% of the weight of the annually products sold? Lenovo runs a product take back program. But, Lenovo only reports that the recycled customer returns in 2014 represents 5.4% of the total weight of products sold in 2010 (see link, page 20, 94-96). Source
12. Is the take back recyling rate higher than 10% of the weight of the annually products sold? See remark for environmental policy question 11. Source
13. Has the brand (company) an active policy in place to increase the product life-span of products, such as longer warranty periods or easy repair with easy ordering of spare parts? Lenovo's reporting on increased product lifespan is limited to its batteries, which are designed to last 2-3 times as long as a standard battery. But, Lenovo does not mention an active policy to increase its products' life-cycle in general, combined with e.g. easy ordering of spare parts or longer, cost-free warranty periods (see link, page 91). Source
14. Does the brand (company) use replaceable batteries in all portable devices? Lenovo offers replaceable batteries in at least some of its products, but it's unclear if all of its products contain them (see link, page 41). Source
15. Does the brand (company) provide online repair manuals for all products? Online repair manuals for Lenovo products are provided via iFixit. Source
16. Does the brand (company) guarantee supply of spare parts and software updates for all products, for at least 3 years after end of production? Lenovo doesn't mention anything concrete about the supply of spare parts or software updates after end of production. Source
17. Does the brand (company) give at least a 3 years warranty on all products? Lenovo offers 3 years warranties for most of their products. However, for Lenovo consumer products warranties vary by product type and geography but typically start at 1-2 years with an optional purchase of an extended warranty. (See link, page 91). Source
18. Does the brand (company) publish a water and/or land use footprint and is there a policy to minimize, reduce or compensate this footprint? Lenovo publishes its water footprint of own operations, which shows a substantial increase of water usage (874,742 m3 FY13/14 vs. 1,202,689 m3 FY14/15). Lenovo claims to identify and implement opportunities to reduce the amount of water they consume (see link, page 19 & 86). Source
19. Does the brand (company) publish a water and/or land use footprint that also covers its most important suppliers? Lenovo publishes the water footprint of its own operations, but not of its most important suppliers. Source

Questions about Labour Conditions/ Fair Trade

5 out of 14
1. Does the brand (company) regularly publish an updated list of smelters that are identified in the own supply chain? Lenovo publishes a list of smelters, for the year 2014 (see link, page 11-17). Source
2. Does the brand (company) have a clear policy to only source from smelters that have passed the conflict-free audits, and has the brand already achieved this for at least one metal/mineral? Lenovo doesn't specify, whether at least one mineral is sourced conflict free. Source
3. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 1 initiative that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Lenovo supports the ITRI Tin Supply Chain Initiative (iTSCi). Source
4. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 2 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Lenovo also supports the Conflict-Free Smelter Program (CFSP). Source
5. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 3 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Lenovo has also joined the IDH Bangka Tin Working Group. Source
6. Is the brand (company) significantly involved in at least 4 initiatives that addresses the urgent appeal to improve the social and environmental conditions of mining metals and minerals; for example tin from endangered tropical islands Bangka and Belitung, conflict minerals from Congo, etc? Lenovo does not mention any other initiatives on its website. Source
7. Does the brand (company) have a Code of Conduct (CoC) for both its own factories and those of its suppliers, which includes the following standards: No forced or slave labor, no child labor, no discrimination of any kind and a safe and hygienic workplace? Lenovo has adopted the EICC Code of Conduct, in which all standards are mentioned (see also link, next question). Source
8. Does the brand’s (company’s) CoC include at least 3 of the following workers rights: 1. a formally registered employment relationship 2. a maximum working week of 48 hours with voluntary paid overtime of 12 hours maximum 3. a sufficient living wage 4. form and join labor unions and bargain collectively; and in those situations where these rights are restricted under law, to develop parallel means? In the EICC CoC: 1. Not mentioned; 2. No, maximum working week is 60 hours (including overtime), 'except in emergency cases and unusual situations', which can mean anything; 3. No, it mentions the legal minimum wage, not living wage, 4. No, Freedom of association is mentioned, but nothing found about situations in which this right is restricted by law. Source
9. Does the brand (company) have a published list of direct suppliers that have collectively contributed to more than 90% of the purchase volume? Lenovo has not published a list of direct suppliers. Source
10. Is the brand (company) a member of a multi stakeholder initiative (MSI), wherein independent NGO’s or labor unions are represented, that collectively aims to improve labor conditions and that carries out independent audits? Or does the brand (company) significantly purchase its supplies from factories certified by such MSI’s? Lenovo is a member of EICC, but civil society organizations do not have a decisive voice in this initiative. Source
11. Does the brand (company) annually report on the results of its labor conditions policy? Are more than 95% of final manufacturing stage production facilities monitored for labour conditions? Lenovo mentions performing audits and publishes some information on these audits. However, the reporting is not specific enough regarding audit results and total production volume covered (see link, page 38). Source
12. Are at least 25% of final manufacturing stage production facilities in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct? See remark for labor conditions policy question 11. Source
13. Are at least 50% of final manufacturing stage production facilities in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct? See remark for labor conditions policy question 11. Source
14. Are at least 50% of final manufacturing stage production facilities in high risk countries compliant to the Code of Conduct - including a living wage? See remark for labor conditions policy question 11. Source